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Liz Lovely – Gluten-Free and Vegan Cookies on Shark Tank

By   /   September 28, 2012  /   1 Comment

Season 4, Episode 3

Liz Lovely website
Liz Lovely on Twitter
Liz Lovely on Facebook

People: Liz and Dan Holtz

Original Offer to the Sharks: $200,000 for 10% stake

Liz Lovely is a Vermont-based cookie business run by a unique couple (and a team) who specialize in gluten-free and vegan cookies. In 2003, Liz and Dan were tired of eating alternative baking company cookies from California and decided to start their own baking business. Over the next few months Liz perfected their recipes and the couple got their big break by sneaking their homemade cookies into a meeting at Whole Foods’ office (uninvited) in Maryland. A month later, Whole Foods got back to them and the rest is history.

The branding of the cookies and the quality of the Liz Lovely website is excellent. It very effectively communicates the company’s mission to bring joy through their vegan and gluten-free cookies. The cookies have 100% natural ingredients and are mixed and baked in Liz Lovely’s facility in the Green Mountains of Vermont.

So, will the Sharks bite into this cookie business? Stay tuned!

Spoiler Alert – Below Video

Did Liz Lovely make a deal on Shark Tank? NO

“You’re a really good sales guy…I just hate your product.” – Kevin O’Leary

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About the author

Owner

Andrew, a Chicago-based web professional and entrepreneur, has owned and operated InTheSharkTank since 2011. Some of his favorite past Shark Tank business pitches include UniKey, Lollacup, Daisy Cakes, and Pork Barrel BBQ. When he's not busy running the website or live-tweeting, Andrew actively pursues disappointment by following the Chicago Cubs, Bears, and Bulls. Google+

1 Comment

  1. Dan Holtz says:

    “You’re a really good sales guy…I just hate your product.” – Kevin O’Leary

    In the pre-edited version, Kevin added that it didn’t matter that he hated the product, because it obviously has a market. He added something like, “But, unfortunately, I can’t add any value to what you’re doing, so I’m out.”

    I think that was the only place where I felt the editing didn’t honestly reflect what happened. Otherwise, I’d say the encapsulated the feeling of the 45-60 minute pitch pretty spot on.

    Thanks for watching!
    -Dan

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